The Last Word

By David Perloff
Publisher

I just hired a new editor. He comes from the Internet, but he seems to be getting along with everyone so far. He's actually pretty funny. We're still getting used to him.

Dude's name is Kyle, and he'll be writing the Editor's Note from now on. I used to write it, but he thinks he should now. So, whatever, let's humor him. how bad could it be, right? As for who gets the last word,
I told him it's him, and I think he bought it.

So, as my name (David Perloff) falls from the top of the editorial masthead, let me introduce you to Kyle hall.

David:

Where did you say you're from again?

Kyle:

Encinitas.

D:

Did you grow up there?

K:

Born and raised. I spent a little over a year in Seattle during high school, but moved back to graduate from La Costa Canyon.

D:

What did you do after college?

K:

I managed the valet account in Balboa Park. If your keys were ever lost in the park, or someone damaged your vehicle, it definitely happened prior to, or after, my tenure.

D:

When was your tenure there?

K:

Before or after all of those bad things happened.

D:

Then what?

K:

I was hired to launch the San Diego edition of an online newsletter called Thrillist. When I was hired, the company had under 50 employees, and when I left they had over 200 - it was a pretty exciting ride. Shortly before my departure, Forbes ranked Thrillist the 15th most promising privately held company in America.

D:

You left a Forbes-ranked web company to work at a magazine? Isn't print dead? And why do web companies brag about getting ranked by magazines?

K:

Yes, far from it and ha - never thought of that. This whole line of questioning reminds me of an old Alanis Morissette song.

D:

How well do you know San Diego?

K:

Well enough that I would not make out with her.

D:

Would you rather be smart or funny?

K:

Definitely smart. If you're funny without the smarts, people will just laugh at you, and I get enough of that already.

D:

You rolled an ATV-looking thing in Mexico during your first week on the job. Should you be allowed to drive the company FIAT?

K:

That question would be more appropriate for your insurance agent.

D:

Anything else?

K:

Just that I couldn't be more excited to unleash this issue (16 pages longer than ever before!) on the city. A lot of talented people put in long hours to pick up my slack and produce, what I think, is the best issue of any magazine that's ever been published.

Before you jump to disagree, Dear Reader, because you still own an issue of Tiger Beat with Tiffany Amber Thiessen on the cover, please read every word in this magazine. Then let me borrow that issue of Tiger Beat because... awesome.

This being PacificSD's first Latino-themed issue, we focus on our neighbors to the immediate south, not because we think Mexico is superior to the other Romance-tongued, Latin American nations, but because of its proximity and daily effects on the lives of San Diegans.

Over the last several years, violent stories about Mexico once featured prominently by American media outlets have appeared less frequently, and, to a large extent, have been replaced by those of a cultural revolution in border cities. As economies were forced to stop relying on the American- tourist dollar, a very interesting thing happened - an explosion in nearly every facet of local culture.

Now, San Diego foodies, fashionistas and craft-beer fanatics need only hop across the border to Tijuana to find an exciting new scene to explore, and there's never been a better time to make the trip.

After going down to take a look for myself after a 15-year absence, the picture I was left with was far different from the one I previously held. By the end of this issue, I hope you'll be left with the same.

- Kyle Hall
Editor-in-Chief

[publisher's note: don't let new guy have last word; add Publisher's Page(s)]

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